Monday
Jul062009

The Home of All Things Interesting

 

The Washington Post is selling Access to Reporters

and Political Figures.

 

 

For $25,000 to $250,000, The Washington Post is offering lobbyists and association executivesoff-the-record, nonconfrontational access to “those powerful few” — Obama administration officials, members of Congress, and the paper’s own reporters and editors.

The astonishing offer is detailed in a flier circulated Wednesday to a health care lobbyist, who provided it to a reporter because the lobbyist said he feels it’s a conflict for the paper to charge for access to, as the flier says, its “health care reporting and editorial staff.”

The offer — which essentially turns a news organization into a facilitator for private lobbyist-official encounters — is a new sign of the lengths to which news organizations will go to find revenue at a time when most newspapers are struggling for survival.

And it’s a turn of the times that a lobbyist is scolding The Washington Post for its ethical practices.

“Underwriting Opportunity: An evening with the right people can alter the debate,” says the one-page flier. “Underwrite and participate in this intimate and exclusive Washington Post Salon, an off-the-record dinner and discussion at the home of CEO and Publisher Katharine Weymouth. … Bring your organization’s CEO or executive director literally to the table. Interact with key Obama administration and congressional leaders…

 And Newspapers wonder why they are a dying breed.  Their Business model is all wrong.  They cannot rely on Classified ads for Revenue.  When they rely on sponsership from anyone else but the reader, then everything is for sale to the highest bidder.

Monday
Jul062009

The Home of All Things Interesting

 

The possible death of Science in the United States.

Scientist tour the Museum of Creation.

 

 

Paleontologists visiting the Creation Museum at the conclusion of a convention got more than they bargained for when they found their life’s work under attack.

After having a few laughs and taking some pictures, most were surprised and offended to see the way in which evolution was being ridiculed by the museum, which some call a “creationist Disneyland”.

“It’s sort of a monument to scientific illiteracy, isn’t it?” Jerry Lipps, professor of geology, paleontology and evolution at University of California, Berkeley, told the AFP news agency. “Like Sunday school with statues… this is a special brand of religion here. I don’t think even most mainstream Christians would believe in this interpretation of Earth’s history.”

Some 715,000 patrons have visited the $27 million museum since it opened in mid-2007 to “bring the pages of the Bible to life.” The 70,000 square-foot facility presents a literal interpretation of the Bible, and suggests that disbelief of this view leads to moral relativism and the breakdown of social values.

University of Akron paleontology professor Lisa Park was moved to tears as she walked down a hallway displaying flashing images of war, famine and natural disasters that the museum blames on belief in evolution.

“I think it’s very bad science and even worse theology — and the theology is far more offensive to me,” Park told the AFP news agency.
[...]
Howard University anatomy professor Daryl Domning shook his head several times throughout his tour of the museum. “This bothers me as a scientist and as a Christian, because it’s just as much a distortion and misrepresentation of Christianity as it is of science,” he told the AFP. “It’s not your old-time religion by any means.” 

 

$250,000 spent on a 60-foot tall Jesus statue. $27 million spent on a Creation "museum," not to mention all the hours of donated labor. Meanwhile, our kids are failing to learn even basic science knowledge in school. Disheartening to a scientist, to say the least.

 

 

 

Monday
Jul062009

The Home of All Things Interesting

  

Apple Blames Global Warming for it's Overheating iPhone 3Gs

 

 

 

 

 

Technology sites and Apple forums have been indundated with comments about the new model overheating and becoming discoloured since it was launched on June 19. Some iPhone users have complained that the device has become too hot to hold to the ear during long calls while others have noticed that the white 32GB model has turned pink after overheating.

In a warning posted on one of the California computer maker’s support knowledge base sites, Apple says that users should not leave their phones in a car where temperatures can exceed the -20C to 45C range that the iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS models were designed to function in. Apple says in the support article that “if the interior temperature of the device exceeds normal operating temperatures, you may experience the following as it attempts to regulate its temperature: the device stops charging, display dims, and/or weak cellular signal”.

In its message, Apple says that the iPhone has a safety feature which warns users that the device is becoming too hot. As well as leaving the handset in a car, it says that the phone may overheat when left in direct sunlight for prolonged periods, when GPS tracking is used in a car on a hot day or when its iPod function is used in direct sunlight.

If the warning appears, Apple says that users of the iPhone should turn the device off and allow it to cool before using it.

iPhone 3GS users on Mac forums complain, however, that the handset becomes hot when it is not being used in a car. In a posting on the macrumors.com forum, one user complained that using the new device’s video recording feature had caused it to overheat while another complained that after carrying his phone in a backpack, it got so hot that the plastic case became distorted with tiny bumps.

 What will they think of Next?  If only Steve Jobs was around to save them now.

Saturday
Jun062009

The Home of All Things Interesting

 

Legal Apple Software Hacker Places Advertisment Directly

 

 Underneath Apple Store Logo.

 

 

 

 

 

The ad invites passersby to try “The Cure for iPhone Envy”, which they can use to access their “iTunes Library on any device. In Seconds”. It’s clearly a message that Apple doesn’t want anything to do with. We’re hearing that Apple employees are currently scratching their heads as to how this appeared. So how did this wind up only a few feet from the store’s entrance, and directly beneath a giant Apple logo?

Apparently the window technically belongs to BART, the Bay Area’s commuter transit system. doubleTwist got in touch with an ad agency that BART deals with and leased the window, giving them the chance to plaster their ad just below the Apple logo in its full glory. This is apparently the first time the window has been used for this purpose (before it just sat bare). And because everything was done legally, Apple’s going to have a hard time getting rid of it.

While DVD Jon has a long history of reverse engineering digital media security, doubleTwist is a perfectly legitimate software application that makes it easy to manage media files for a variety of hardware devices. It’s sort of like iTunes, except it works for nearly any device — not just your iPod and iPhone, and the app now supports both Windows and Mac). Given that one of the iPod’s biggest advantages over competitors is the seamless experience it offers to users, Apple probably isn’t a big fan.

 

The Story is from here -

http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/06/05/apple-gets-pwned-sf-store-is-now-advertising-dvd-jons-doubletwist/

 

Saturday
Jun062009

The Home of All Things Interesting

What is Higgs Boson?

 

The theories and discoveries of thousands of physicists over the past century have resulted in a remarkable insight into the fundamental structure of matter: everything in the Universe is found to be made from twelve basic building blocks called fundamental particles, governed by four fundamental forces.

Our best understanding of how these twelve particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particles and forces. Developed in the 1960s and 70s, it has successfully explained a host of experimental results and precisely predicted a wide variety of phenomena. Over time and through many experiments by many physicists, the Standard Model has become established as a well-tested physics theory.

 

 

This is a Picture of a Particle Collision....

Let's see you can tell the Particles apart

Saturday
Jun062009

The Home of All Things Interesting

Wall E Computer Case, Custom Made

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Russian Custom case, you can see all the pictures at

 http://acidcow.com/pics/2059-russian-wall-e-case-mod-110-pics.html

Saturday
May302009

The Home of All Things Interesting

Interesting Road Sign Picture

 

 

Saturday
May302009

The Home of All Things Interesting

DIY Guy Builds His Own PC, 



Intel’s fabrication plants can churn out hundreds of thousands of processor chips a day. But what does it take to handcraft a single 8-bit CPU and a computer? Give or take 18 months, about $1,000 and 1,253 pieces of wire.

Steve Chamberlin, a Belmont, California, videogame developer by day, set out on a quest to custom design and build his own 8-bit computer. The homebrew CPU would be called Big Mess of Wires or BMOW. Despite its name, it is a painstakingly created work of art.

The BMOW is closest in design to the MOS Technology 6502 processor used in the Apple II, Commodore 64 and early Atari videogame consoles. Chamberlin designed his CPU to have three 8-bit data registers, a 24-bit address size and 12 addressing modes. It took him about a year and a half from design to finish. Almost all the components come from the 1970s- and 1980s-era technology.

The BMOW isn’t just a CPU. Chamberlin added a keyboard input, an LCD output that shows a strip of text, a USB connection, three-voice audio, and VGA video output to turn it into a functioning computer.

Saturday
May302009

The Home of All Things Interesting

Feds Probing Possible Oil Market

Manipulation

 

 

The Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the government agency responsible for overseeing the trading of energy contracts, has taken the unusual step of revealing a six-month investigation into possible price manipulation.

The announcement comes amid a breathtaking spike in oil prices and growing speculation that speculators are a big cause of consumer misery.

"All Americans are significantly affected by high energy prices—whether it's paying more at the pump, or higher costs for farmers and entrepreneurs," said CFTC Acting Chairman Walt Lukken. "The Commission is taking important steps to ensure that the U.S. energy futures markets function properly and operate free from manipulation and abuse. With these initiatives, we are improving our oversight capabilities and bringing greater sunshine to these markets."

Prices on the oil futures market have surged 32 percent this year and have increased fourfold in the last five years.

On Thursday, oil futures fell more than $4 a barrel to $126.62 on the New York Mercantile Exchange, after topping $130 a barrel earlier in May. Gasoline prices at the pump have reached a national average of $3.95 a gallon, up from about $3.20 a gallon a year ago. In a number of states, the average price has exceeded $4 a gallon.


Read more: "Feds Probing Possible Oil Market Manipulation" - http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2008/05/gas_prices246.html#ixzz0H0Lq57Y8&A

Saturday
May302009

The Home of All Things Interesting

Starting out the Website is The Real News.

The Website is under Construction and the Backend Operations have begun.

To keep our Viewers Happy, we will be posting updated information under our Real News Segment as long as theylet us keep posting the information that impacts our world.

 

They want to Rename the "God Particle"

 

 

I once asked a brilliant physicist at Manchester University what he thought of the name the media use for the Higgs boson, the mysterious particle that is regarded as the universal origin of mass. That name, of course, is the God particle.

It is partly with thanks to names like “God particle” and spurious end-of-the-world scenarios that the Large Hadron Collider at Cern near Geneva got so much coverage when it was switched on last year. And broke…

But back to the physicist in Manchester. He paused. He sighed. And then he said: “I really, really don’t like it. It sends out all the wrong messages. It overstates the case. It makes us look arrogant. It’s rubbish.” He then added: “If you walked down the corridor here, poked your head into people’s offices and asked that question, you would likely be struck by flying books…”

Below I’ve set out the best criteria I can find for how to come up with a good name for a new particle. Depending on the number of entries, we’ll select the winner by: consulting physicists; testing the entries on the humanities graduates who run the Guardian’s newsdesk, aka “The Gate Keepers”; or by printing them out on a sheet of paper and asking the chef to throw a dart at it*.

The winner will receive a copy of Science: A Four Thousand Year History by Patricia Fara, and a surprise Higgs boson-themed gift.

Three simple rules:

1) Names should be serious and accurate
2) It is good to name things after people, but only if you can resist the pressure to hyphenate with two or three extra names
3) Names should be evocative and inspiring.

The closing date is midnight Monday 1st June 2009


Click the link above to cast your vote
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